Writers' First Review Draft:    (2VA3)

Term    (2W42)

Integration    (2W43)

Origin/Source for Inclusion of the Term    (2W44)

OMB Enterprise Architecture Assessment Framework Version 1.5    (2W45)

OMB Context Definition    (2W46)

Reference/URL OMB Context Definition    (2W47)

Business Definition    (2W48)

Assesses how well the EA ensures the standardization of interfaces, interoperation, information, and connectivity. Using the specific criteria provided, an agency identifies the level best describing its EAs A) interoperability, B) data, C) business logic, and D) interface.    (2W49)

Reviewer Comment: Too complicated. Please simplify and reduce to one sentence.    (2W4A)

Reference/URL for Business Definition    (2W4B)

The White House Homepage on-line. Office of Management and Budget, Information Policy, IT & E-gov, Documents; http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/egov/documents/OMB_Enterprise_Architecture_Assessment_v1.5_FINAL.pdf ; specifically, pages 3, A-2, B-3, B-4, B-5; Internet; Accessed 29 June 2005.    (2W4C)

Technical Definition    (2W4D)

For the purpose of OMB Enterprise Architecture assessments dealing with the results orientation of an Enterprise Architecture (EA), no further technical specificity is required.    (2W4E)

Reference/URL Technical Definition    (2W4F)

The White House Homepage on-line. Office of Management and Budget, Information Policy, IT & E-gov, Documents; http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/egov/documents/OMB_Enterprise_Architecture_Assessment_v1.5_FINAL.pdf ; specifically, pages 3, A-2, B-3, B-4, B-5; Internet; Accessed 29 June 2005.    (2W4G)

Context Definition 1    (2W4H)

The broader use of this term outside of the OMB Enterprise Architecture Assessment Framework, with respect to information technology, is often associated with Enterprise application integration.    (2W4I)

Enterprise application integration (EAI) is the use of software and architectural principles to bring together (integrate) a set of enterprise computer applications. It is an area of computer systems architecture that gained wide recognition from about 2004 onwards. EAI is related to middleware technologies such as message-oriented middleware MOM, and data representation technologies such as XML. Newer EAI technologies involve using web services as part of service-oriented architecture as a means of integration. Without integration, enterprise computing often takes the form of islands of automation, where the value of individual systems is not maximized because they are working in partial or full isolation. However if integration is carried out without following a structured EAI approach, many point-to-point connections grow up across an organization. Dependencies are added on an ad-hoc basis, resulting in a tangled unmaintainable mess, commonly referred to as spaghetti.    (2W4J)

Current thinking is that the best approach to EAI is to use a message bus to connect numerous separate systems together. Other approaches have been explored, connecting at the database level or at the user-interface level. However, the message bus approach has generally been adopted as the strategic winner. Individual applications can publish messages to the bus, and also subscribe to receive certain messages from the bus.    (2W4K)

With EAI each application only requires one connection, which is to the bus. Attending to EAI involves looking at the system of systems. Such message bus approaches can be extremely scalable, and also highly evolvable.    (2W4L)

EAI is not just about sharing data between applications. EAI focuses on sharing both business data and business process.    (2W4M)

Reference/URL Context Definition 1    (2W4N)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia; Available from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enterprise_application_integration ; Internet; Accessed 30 June 2005.    (2W4O)

Context Definition 2    (2W4P)

Reference/URL for Context Definition 2    (2W4Q)

Context Definition 3    (2W4R)

Reference/URL for Context Definition 3    (2W4S)

See Also Related Terms    (2W4T)